TOMATO CURRY APOTOXIN APTX 4869 FOOD AI HAIBARA FUNNY ITEM

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So apparently there's something about how Gosho made 4869 (apotoxin) stand for Sherlochồng Holmes in Japanese. I mean I already know how Gosho likes khổng lồ add these little puns and references since this is also seen in the episode where Ran is trying to open up Conan's phone because she suspected hyên & is trying different numbers that stand for different things. But what I'm asking here is how does it stand for Sherlochồng Holmes? If anyone knows how or is fluent in Japanese can explain it khổng lồ me.... nothing too complicated cuz i'm just really curious....

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level 1
· 3 yr. ago · edited 3 yr. ago
If I remember correctly is because 4869 is pronounced as xi ha rou kou, which sounds lượt thích Sherloông chồng in Japanese? (Shi ha roku kyu for more English like sound)


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màn chơi 2
· 3 yr. ago

The Japanese language actually has many different number systems usually based on counters, so 9 can be kyu or ku. 8 can be used for habỏ ra or ha in this case. 4 is shi or yon, etc.

So you are correct: 4 8 6 9 = shi + ha + ro + ku = sherlock


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cấp độ 2
Op · 3 yr. ago

Hm. Its pretty cool how you can do that in Japanese. Just making words with numbers.

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level 2
· 3 yr. ago
Ai Haibara

4 is shi


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cấp độ 1
· 3 yr. ago
The numbers 4 8 6 9 can be pronounced as "shi ya ro ku", or Sherloông chồng, if you will.

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màn chơi 2
Op · 3 yr. ago

Aah i get it! Thanks


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màn chơi 1
· 3 yr. ago · edited 3 yr. ago
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_wordplay#Numeric_substitution

The series và its Japanese-language fans use it a lot (though not exclusively). For example, the following are "days" celebrated by the Japanese-language fandom, which I discovered by Twitter searching "灰原" ("Haibara") on Haibara day by accident (source—I'm not sure if all of these are celebrated, but there was a lot of Haibara fanart on Haibara day):

5/1 (MM/DD) is CoAi day: 5 is read "go" (ご), voiceless "ko" (こ) & 1 looks like the letter "I", which sounds like Ai

8/18 is Haibara day: 8 is "ha" (from the Japanese word for 8, "hachi"), 1 is "i" ("ichi"), & 8 is "ha" again (は), but w/ rendaku can be "ba" (ば), and the "ra" implied, for "Haiba(ra)"

4/1: Shi(n)/ichi day

8/10: Ha(t)/to(ri) day

9/10: Ku/ vì chưng day where 10 is "tou" (とう) but is read "dou" (どう) when voiced

3/8: Mi/ya(no) day

1/4: Kaito Kid day, but only at 12 noon, from the in-story origin of his name, 1412 misread as a hastily written "KID"

In-story, there was one instance in a later arc where Kogoro's computer password was "5563": ko(ご→こ)-go-ro(ku)-san. In an earlier story, "812" stood for "Haiji" ("Heidi", as in "Heidi, the Girl of the Alps", is rendered ハイジ read "Haiji" in Japanese)—ha(chi), i(chi) và ji because the kanji for 2, 二, is sometimes read as "ji", mainly in names—which was a pun Kogoro made early on about the "Alps seats" of Koshien Stadium, which helped getting khổng lồ the culprit quickly later on.